U.S. AMATEUR
Inside the Field Competing at Pinehurst No. 2 and No. 4 August 9, 2019 | LIBERTY CORNER, N.J. By Joey Geske, USGA

Brandon Wu of Scarsdale, N.Y., enters the U.S. Amateur as the No. 8 player in the World Amateur Golf Ranking. (USGA/Darren Carroll)

2019 U.S. Amateur Home | Tickets

The field is set, and 312 of the best amateurs from around the world are ready to compete in the the 119th U.S. Amateur Championship at Pinehurst Resort & Country Club. It is the 10th USGA championship to take place at the famed resort in the North Carolina Sandhills, on the heels of the 2017 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball Championship and the back-to-back U.S. Open and U.S. Women's Open that were held there in 2014. The following is a statistical and biographical look at the field.

Average Age of Field: 22.09

Oldest Competitors:
Sean Knapp (57, born March 15, 1962)
Michael McCoy (56, born Nov. 21, 1962)
Jeff Wilson (56, born June 14, 1963)

Youngest Competitors:
Jay Brooks (14, born Nov. 16, 2004)
Zachary Ong (14, born Oct. 5, 2004)
Nick Dunlap (15, born Dec. 23, 2003)
Lincoln Melcher (15, born Dec. 12, 2003)
Luke Clanton (15, born Nov. 5, 2003)
William Love (15, born Aug. 1, 2003)

International Field (Number of players) – There are 27 countries represented in the 2019 U.S. Amateur, including United States (246), Canada (9), Australia (5), England (5), Spain (5), Japan (3), Mexico (3), Republic of Ireland (3), Sweden (3), Argentina (2), Austria (2), Germany (2), Puerto Rico (2), Scotland (2), South Africa (2), Belgium (1), Chinese Taipei (1),  Denmark (1), France (1), India (1), Italy (1), Netherlands (1), New Zealand (1), Norway (1), People’s Republic of China (1), Singapore (1) and Thailand (1)

U.S. States Represented (Number of players) – There are 41 states and the District of Columbia (1) represented in the 2019 U.S. Amateur: California (44), Texas (26), Florida (19), North Carolina (15), Pennsylvania (12), Georgia (10), Kentucky (9), Massachusetts (9), New York (8), Arizona (7), Illinois (7), Ohio (7), Minnesota (5), Oklahoma (5), South Carolina (5), Tennessee (5), Mississippi (4), New Jersey (4), Virginia (4), Washington (4), Alabama (3), Colorado (3), Iowa (3), Indiana (3), Maryland (3), Michigan (3), Wisconsin (3), Hawaii (2), Kansas (2), Louisiana (2), Missouri (2), Nebraska (2), Nevada (2), Oregon (2), Utah (2), Arkansas (1), Connecticut (1), Idaho (1), North Dakota (1), Wyoming (1)

There are 11 USGA champions in the field:
Philip Barbaree (2015 Junior Amateur)
Stewart Hagestad (2016 Mid-Amateur)
Cole Hammer (2018 Amateur Four-Ball)
Scott Harvey (2019 Amateur Four-Ball, 2014 Mid-Amateur)
Sean Knapp (2017 Senior Amateur)
Michael McCoy (2013 Mid-Amateur)
Kevin O’Connell (2018 Mid-Amateur)
Matt Parziale (2017 Mid-Amateur)
Preston Summerhays (2019 Junior Amateur)
Michael Thorbjornsen (2018 Junior Amateur)
Jeff Wilson (2018 Senior Amateur)

There are 10 USGA championship runners-up in the field:
Akshay Bhatia (2018 Junior Amateur)
Devon Bling (2018 U.S. Amateur)
Brett Boner (2018 Mid-Amateur)
Brad Dalke (2016 Amateur)
Scott Harvey (2016 Mid-Amateur)
Bo Jin (2019 Junior Amateur)
Sean Knapp (2018 Senior Amateur)
Andrew Orischak (2015 Junior Amateur)
Garrett Rank (2012 Mid-Amateur)
Ben Warnquist (2016 Amateur Four-Ball)

NHL referee Garrett Rank, of Canada, is coming into the U.S. Amateur fresh off a big victory at the Western Amateur. (USGA/Ben Solomon)

There are 14 players in the field who also competed in the 2019 U.S. Open Championship at Pebble Beach:
Devon Bling
Chandler Eaton
Austin Eckroat
Stewart Hagestad
Daniel Hillier
Noah Norton
Kevin O’Connell
Matt Parziale
Jovan Rebula
Michael Thorbjornsen
Spencer Tibbits
Brandon Wu
Cameron Young
Chun An Yu    

There are 4 players in the field who also competed in the 2019 Open Championship at Royal Portrush:
Takumi Kanaya
James Sugrue
Matthias Schmid
Brandon Wu    

There are 3 players in the field who also competed in the 2019 U.S. Senior Open Championship at the Warren Golf Course at Notre Dame:
Sean Knapp
Michael McCoy
Jeff Wilson    

There are 14 players in the field who also competed in the 2019 U.S. Junior Amateur Championship at the Inverness Club:
Austin Barbin
Akshay Bhatia
Michael Brennan
Ricky Castillo
Austin Greaser
Palmer Jackson
Bo Jin (runner-up)
Maxwell Moldovan
William Mouw
James Song
Preston Summerhays (champion)
Michael Thorbjornsen
Karl Vilips
Andi Xu       

Some Notable Players in the Field:

Mason Andersen, 20, of Chandler, Ariz., competed in the 2017 U.S. Open at Erin Hills, where he missed the cut by one stroke. Andersen, a junior at Arizona State University, tied for 16th in the 2019 Pac-12 Conference Championship. He was named the 2017 Arizona Golf Association player of the year. Andersen, who is competing in his fourth consecutive U.S. Amateur, won the Arizona Stroke Play Championship, earned medalist honors in the Arizona Amateur and advanced to U.S. Open sectional qualifying in 2016.

Philip Barbaree, 22, of Shreveport, La., won the 2015 U.S. Junior Amateur by defeating Andrew Orischak in 37 holes and posted a championship record for largest comeback, coming from 5 down with eight holes to play. Barbaree, a senior at Louisiana State University, is competing in his fifth U.S. Amateur. He played in last year’s U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club. Barbaree won two Division I individual state high school championships and helped C.E. Byrd High garner the 2016 team title. In 2019, he finished third at the Southern Amateur Championship.

Richard “Skip” Berkmeyer, 46, of St. Louis, Mo., qualified for his 10th U.S. Amateur on July 23. This is his 31st USGA championship, a list that includes reaching the Round of 16 twice in the U.S. Mid-Amateur. Berkmeyer, owner of a custom trophy company, has three Missouri State Amateur titles.

Akshay Bhatia, 17, of Wake Forest, N.C., was the runner-up to Michael Thorbjornsen in the 2018 U.S. Junior Amateur at Baltusrol Golf Club. He also advanced to match play in the last year’s U.S. Amateur at Pebble Beach. In 2019, Bhatia won the Jones Cup Invitational and the Dustin Johnson World Junior. He also made his PGA Tour debut at the Valspar Championship and tied for 42nd in his first Korn Ferry Tour event. In 2018, he captured his second consecutive Boys Junior PGA, the Junior Invitational at Sage Valley and the Polo Golf Junior Classic. Bhatia, whose sister Rhea was a member of the Queens University of Charlotte women’s golf team, aced the 17th hole at Pinehurst No. 2 when he was age 12. Bhatia will represent the USA in the 2019 Walker Cup next month at Royal Liverpool.

Devon Bling, 19, of Ridgecrest, Calif., was the runner-up to Viktor Hovland in the final of the 2018 U.S. Amateur at Pebble Beach. He competed in this year’s U.S. Open, as well as the Masters, where he made the cut and finished 55th. Bling, a junior at UCLA, finished sixth in the 2019 Pac-12 Championships as a sophomore. In 2018, Bling won the California State Fair Amateur following his runner-up finish at the U.S. Amateur.

Brett Boner, 45, of Charlotte, N.C., was the runner-up in the 2018 U.S. Mid-Amateur at Charlotte Country Club in his hometown, losing to Kevin O’Connell, 4 and 3. Boner, a financial advisor, is a member at Carolina Golf Club and was runner-up in the 2017 Carolinas Mid-Amateur. In 2018, he won his second Charlotte City Amateur by one stroke at Charlotte Country Club. Boner is competing in his fourth USGA championship ad first U.S. Amateur.

Colin Bowles, 19, of Albany, Ga., won the Georgia State Amateur in 2016 and at age 16, was the youngest winner of that event since Bob Jones in 1916. Bowles, a sophomore on the Georgia Southern men’s golf team, is competing in his fourth USGA championship.

Jacob Bridgeman, 19, of Inman, S.C., reached the Round of 16 in the 2018 U.S. Junior Amateur. Bridgeman, a sophomore at Clemson, was second on the team in scoring average and had four top 10’s during his freshman season, including co-champion of the 2019 Puerto Rico Classic. Bridgeman won the 2016 Carolina Junior Boys and three individual state championships in high school.

Ricky Castillo, 18, of Yorba Linda, Calif., was the youngest player (age 14) in the 2015 U.S. Amateur and reached the Round of 32 in 2017 at Riviera Country Club. Castillo, competing in his third U.S. Amateur, has played in the last three U.S. Junior Amateurs where he was a stroke play co-medalist in 2019 and advanced to the Round of 16 in both 2018 and 2017. He recently completed his senior year at Valencia High School and will attend the University of Florida in the fall. Castillo was a quarterfinalist and stroke-play medalist in the 2019 North & South Amateur in June and was third in the Junior Invitational at Sage Valley. His brother, Derek, who plays at Cal State-Fullerton, tied for 10th in the 2019 Big West Conference Championship and competed in the 2013 U.S. Junior Amateur and 2014 U.S. Amateur.

Parker Coody, 19, and Pierceson Coody, 19, of Plano, Texas, are twin brothers and both sophomores on the University of Texas golf team, which finished second at the 2019 NCAA Division I Men’s Championship. They are grandsons of 1971 Masters champion Charles Coody and caddied for their grandfather in the Masters par 3 tournament when they were 6 years old. They are the only set of brothers in this year’s field.

Jordan Costello, 21, of Pinedale, Wyo., is playing in his third U.S. Amateur (also 2016 and 2018). Pinedale, Wyo., is at the base of three mountain ranges and its elevation is 7,200 feet. The population is 1,900 and there is only a nine-hole course nearby as the closest course is 80 miles away in Jackson Hole. Costello set his high school’s basketball scoring record with 47 points in a game in his sophomore season. He also holds the school scoring mark of 1,525 points. He will begin his senior season as a member of the University of Utah golf team this fall.

Chris Crisologo, 23, of Canada, will play in his fourth consecutive U.S. Amateur. He was a four-time Division II All-America selection as a member of the Simon Fraser University team in British Columbia. Crisologo, who resides in Richmond, B.C., won the 2018 British Columbia Amateur, 2018 South American Amateur and the 2019 South American Championship.

Brad Dalke, 21, of Norman, Okla., is competing in his 11th USGA championship and sixth U.S. Amateur. Dalke was the runner-up to Curtis Luck in the 2016 U.S. Amateur and played in the 2017 Masters. A 2019 graduate of the University of Oklahoma, he helped the Sooners capture the 2017 NCAA Championship by winning the decisive match in the victory over Oregon. Dalke helped the USA claim the 2018 Palmer Cup at the Evian Resort Golf Club in France. His father (Bill) was a starting linebacker on Oklahoma’s 1975 national championship football team and his mother (Kay Pryor) played on the first Oklahoma women’s golf team.

Steven DiLisio, 21, of Swampscott, Mass., is competing in his second straight U.S. Amateur. DiLisio, a senior at Duke University, is one of three current Blue Devils in the field. Last month, he won the 111th Massachusetts Amateur Championship at The Country Club in Brookline, defeating Jimmy Hervol, 3 and 2, in the championship match.

Cooper Dossey, 21, of Austin, Texas, qualified for this championship at White Deer Run Golf Club in Vernon Hills, Ill., which brings the Baylor University senior back to the site of his victory in the 2019 North & South Amateur, played in late June. Dossey is making his first U.S. Amateur appearance.

John Eades, 36, of Charlotte, N.C., is playing in his first U.S. Amateur since 2001. Eades, a former University of Maryland Terrapin, won the 2017 Carolinas Mid-Amateur. In 2019, he won the North Carolina Amateur Championship by five strokes.

Chandler Eaton, 21, of Alpharetta, Ga., qualified for his first U.S. Open in June and was one of four amateurs to make the cut, finishing T-58 at Pebble Beach. Eaton, a rising senior and two-time All-ACC selection at Duke University, is competing in his third U.S. Amateur. During his junior season with the Blue Devils, Eaton was named a second-team All-American after winning the 2019 Nike Collegiate Challenge and finishing tied for seventh at the NCAA Athens Regional. His father, Scott, played golf at Texas-Arlington, and his mother, Kim, played golf for Iowa State.

Jason Enloe, 46, of Dallas, Texas, is entering his sixth season as the head men’s golf coach at Southern Methodist University. He is playing in his fourth U.S. Amateur but his first since he competed in three consecutive in 1995 (quarterfinalist), 1996 (Round of 16) and 1997. A reinstated amateur since 2015, he won twice on the Nationwide Tour. He was a member of the USA Team at the 1996 World Amateur Team Championship. Enloe has two young daughters. His wife, Katie, died from leukemia in July 2018, just six months after her diagnosis. He will be joined at the Amateur by two of his current players, McClure “Mac” Meissner and Ollie Osborne.

Jeromino Esteve, 38, of Windermere, Fla., gained the only spot out of the qualifier in his native Puerto Rico on July 18-19. He is the vice president/general manager of an auto dealership and a driving instructor of high-performance racing cars. He has built a car that was used in endurance racing and he has completed a 25-hour endurance race. A cancer survivor, he has played in four Latin America Amateur Championships and three World Amateur Team Championships for Puerto Rico (2012, 2014, 2016). He was captain of the Dartmouth College golf team and earned All-New England recognition in 2003. This is his third appearance at the U.S. Amateur.

Alex Fitzpatrick, 19, of England, reached the quarterfinals of the 2018 U.S. Amateur at Pebble Beach. He is the younger brother of Matthew Fitzpatrick, who owns five PGA European Tour victories and tied for 12th in the last two U.S. Opens. Alex, who will be a sophomore at Wake Forest University, was on the bag for his brother when Matthew won the 2013 U.S. Amateur at The Country Club in Brookline, Mass. In 2018, he was the runner-up to Billy McKenzie in the Spanish International Amateur, finished fourth in the Irish Amateur Open Championship and tied for 21st in the European Amateur Championship.

Sam Goldenring, 21, of Florham Park, N.J., will be competing in his second consecutive U.S. Amateur. He is a senior at Williams College in Massachusetts, where he earned All-New England Small College Athletic Conference and Ping All-Northeast Region honors for a third consecutive year. As a junior, Goldenring won the 2019 NCAA Division III National Championship, which was his fourth victory of the season.

Austin Greaser, 18, of Vandalia, Ohio, was a quarterfinalist in the 2019 U.S. Junior Amateur at Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio, losing, 2 down, to eventual champion Preston Summerhays. Greaser, an incoming freshman at the University of North Carolina, is competing in his first U.S. Amateur. He finished third in the 2018 Ohio Division I state championship and placed fifth in 2017.

Ben Greve, 38, of Minneapolis, Minn., is an insurance agent who is competing in his fourth USGA championship. He has twice won the Minnesota State Open (2016, 2017) and was a member of Minnesota’s 2002 NCAA Championship team. Greve is married to Lindsay Whalen, a four-time WNBA champion with the Minnesota Lynx and a two-time Olympic gold medalist (2012, 2016) who is now the University of Minnesota’s head women’s basketball coach.

Will Grimmer, 22, of Cincinnati, Ohio, qualified for the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst No. 2, where he was the youngest player (age 17) in the field. He also recorded the only 59 in Pinehurst history on Course No. 1 during the 2013 North & South Junior Amateur. Grimmer was one of three amateurs to make the 36-hole cut in the 2018 U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club, where he finished 66th. He is playing in his sixth consecutive U.S. Amateur and 13th USGA championship. He advanced to the Round of 32 at Olympia Fields (Ill.) Country Club in 2015. Grimmer, who graduated from Ohio State University this spring, was a two-time All-Big Ten Second Team honoree with two victories for the Buckeyes. In 2019, he finished tied for second in The Players Amateur at Berkeley Hall Golf Club and represented the United States in the Arnold Palmer Cup.

Stewart Hagestad, 28, of Newport Beach, Calif., played in this year’s U.S. Open at Pebble Beach, becoming the first amateur in 34 years to qualify for three consecutive U.S. Opens. Hagestad is competing in his 10th U.S. Amateur and 18th USGA championship. He won the 2016 U.S. Mid-Amateur by defeating Scott Harvey in 37 holes and was a member of the winning 2017 USA Walker Cup Team. Hagestad, who became the second-youngest Mid-Amateur champion, produced the largest comeback victory (4 down with 5 holes to play) since a 36-hole final was introduced in 2001. He was the low amateur in the 2017 Masters Tournament, tying for 36th. Hagestad was a member of the University of Southern California golf team, graduating in 2013. He reached the Round of 16 in last year’s U.S. Amateur at Pebble Beach and was a semifinalist in the 2018 U.S. Mid-Amateur. In 2019, he finished tied for second at both The Players Amateur and the Northeast Amateur Invitational. Hagestad will represent the USA in the 2019 Walker Cup next month.

Cole Hammer, 19, of Houston, Texas, was a stroke play co-medalist in last year’s U.S. Amateur at Pebble Beach and reached the semifinals. A sophomore at the University of Texas, Hammer also won the 2018 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball with partner Garrett Barber and was a semifinalist in last year’s U.S. Junior Amateur at Baltusrol Golf Club. In his freshman season, he helped lead the Longhorns to a runner-up finish in the 2019 NCAA Championships, earned Golf Coaches Association of America First Team All-America honors and had eight top-10 finishes in 11 events, including tying for medalist honors in three events. Hammer, who was the third-youngest player to compete in a U.S. Open when he played at Chambers Bay at age 15 in 2015, is playing his third U.S. Amateur and tenth USGA championship. Hammer won the 2018 Western Amateur and has been the ranked No. 1 on the World Amateur Golf Rankings since June 2019. He will represent the USA in the 2019 Walker Cup next month.

Scott Harvey, 41, of Greensboro, N.C., is competing in his ninth U.S. Amateur and 31st USGA championship. He won the 2014 U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship, which earned him an invitation to the 2015 Masters, and was the runner-up to Stewart Hagestad in the 2016 U.S. Mid-Amateur. Harvey, a property manager, was a member of the 2015 USA Walker Cup Team and qualified to play in his first U.S. Open in 2017 at Erin Hills. Harvey, who has reached match play in all 11 U.S. Mid-Amateurs he has competed in, won his second USGA championship at the 2019 U.S. Amateur Four-Ball in Bandon, Ore., with partner Todd Mitchell. He has two North Carolina Mid-Amateur titles (2012, 2017) and three Carolinas Mid-Amateur titles (2012, 2013, 2016).

Bo Jin, 17, of the People’s Republic of China, was the runner-up in the 2019 U.S. Junior Amateur at Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio, losing 2 and 1 to Preston Summerhays in the final. Jin attends Futures Academy in Carlsbad, Calif., and is playing in his first U.S. Amateur. His brother, Cheng, played in three U.S. Amateurs, won the 2015 Asia-Pacific Amateur and competed in the 2016 Masters. His sister, Jiarui (Joyce) Jin, was co-medalist in the 2019 U.S. Women’s Amateur and also competed in this year’s U.S. Girls’ Junior.

Tyler Jones, 18, of Westerville, Ohio, won the 2018 Boys’ North & South Junior played on Pinehurst’s No. 8 and No. 2 courses. Jones, an incoming freshman at Marshall University, is competing in his first U.S. Amateur and second USGA championship after playing in the 2017 U.S. Junior Amateur.

Sean Knapp, 57, of Oakmont, Pa., won the 2017 U.S. Senior Amateur, defeating Paul Simson, 2 and 1, at The Minikahda Club, in Minneapolis, Minn. His effort to repeat as champion came up short last year as he finished runner-up to Jeff Wilson in the 2018 final. Knapp is competing in his 15th U.S. Amateur and his 48th USGA championship. He advanced to the U.S. Amateur quarterfinals in 1998 and reached the Round of 16 in the 1995 U.S. Amateur before losing, 2 and 1, to eventual champion Tiger Woods. He is a 14-time Western Pennsylvania Golf Association Player of the Year. Knapp, who is vice president of financial sales for an investment management firm, began playing golf at age 19 while caddieing at Oakmont (Pa.) Country Club. He played college basketball at Indiana University of Pennsylvania.

Brandon Mancheno, 19, of Jacksonville, Fla., is playing in his fourth U.S. Amateur and seventh USGA championship. Mancheno, a junior at Auburn University, earned his first collegiate title last season at the Tiger Invitational. As a freshman, he was chosen to the National All-Freshman Team and voted Southeastern Conference Freshman of the Year. He carded a course-record 63 in the first round of stroke play before losing in the Round of 64 in the 2017 U.S. Junior Amateur at Flint Hills National Golf Club. He also reached match play in 2016 and was the stroke-play medalist and advanced to the Round of 32 in 2015. Mancheno was the runner-up in the 2017 Florida State Amateur and won the 2016 Class 3A state high school championship.

Mike McCoy, 56, of Des Moines, Iowa, and Nathaniel McCoy, 29, of Ankeny, Iowa, are the first father-son combination to play in the U.S. Amateur since father Philip Pleat and his son, James, of New Hampshire played at Cherry Hills Country Club in Colorado in 2012. Mike, the 2013 U.S. Mid-Amateur champion who played on the 2015 USA Walker Cup Team, has had a decorated career as an amateur. He was the low amateur in the 2014 and 2015 U.S. Senior Opens. As a result of his 2013 Mid-Amateur win, he played in the 2014 Masters. Like his father, Nathaniel is a reinstated amateur. He won the 2011 Dogwood Invitational and played collegiately at Iowa State before playing as a professional in Canada for five years, winning eight times. He is an administrator for the Iowa State Golf Association. The McCoys are the fifth father-son combination to play in the same U.S. Amateur, joining Dick and Dixie Chapman (1958), Paul and Brett Quigley (1988) and David and Michael Derminio (2001) and the Pleats.

David Micheluzzi, 23, of Australia, was a semifinalist at The Amateur Championship in Ireland this June after reaching the quarterfinals in 2018. He was the runner-up to Keita Nakajima in the 2018 Australian Amateur after defeating Shae Wools-Cobb in the semifinals. Micheluzzi is competing in his second USGA championship and second straight U.S. Amateur after missing the cut last year at Pebble Beach. He also won the 2018 Australian Master of the Amateurs by five strokes at Royal Melbourne with a four-round total of 270.

Jesus Montenegro, 22, of Argentina, is making his second appearance in the U.S. Amateur after becoming the first Jacksonville State player to qualify for the national championship since 2003. At Pebble Beach, he defeated then-WAGR No. 1 Braden Thornberry, 2 and 1, in the Round of 64 before losing to eventual quarterfinalist Alex Fitzpatrick in the next round. Montenegro was the Ohio Valley Conference Freshman of the Year in 2019.

William Mouw, 18, of Chino, Calif., advanced to the Round of 16 in last year’s U.S. Amateur at Pebble Beach. Mouw has also reached the Round of 32 in two consecutive U.S. Junior Amateurs (2018, 2019). He won the 108th California State Amateur when he defeated Christian Banke, 4 and 2, in the final on June 29. Mouw, the son of a chicken egg farmer, also claimed this year’s Thunderbird Junior Invitational and Ping Heather Farr Golf Classic. In 2017, he won the Western Junior by eight strokes, tying 1999 U.S. Junior Amateur champion Hunter Mahan’s 72-hole scoring record. Mouw, the winner of the 2015 IMG Junior World Championship (ages 13-14), was a member of the basketball and golf teams at Ontario Christian High School and will attend Pepperdine University in the fall.

Noah Norton, 20, of Chico, Calif., finished runner-up to Cooper Dossey in the 2019 North & South Amateur Championship at Pinehurst No. 2. He qualified for this year’s U.S. Open at Pebble Beach and advanced to the Round of 16 in the 2017 U.S. Amateur at The Riviera Country Club. Norton has reached match play in two U.S. Junior Amateurs (2016, 2017). A junior at Georgia Tech, he posted three top-10 finishes in his sophomore season. Norton was the 2017 California State Amateur runner-up.

Kevin O’Connell, 31, of Cary, N.C., won the 2018 U.S. Mid-Amateur championship, defeating Brett Boner, 4 and 3, at Charlotte Country Club, earning exemptions into the 2019 U.S. Open and Masters Tournament. In 2018, he tied for sixth in the Porter Cup, tied for fourth in the Carolinas Mid-Amateur and tied for third in the North Carolina Mid-Amateur. O’Connell, who works for a club manufacturer, earned All-America and All-Atlantic Conference honors at the University of North Carolina, along with being named the 2008 ACC rookie of the year. He is playing in his seventh USGA championship and second U.S. Amateur.

John Pak, 20, of Scotch Plains, N.J., is competing in his third U.S. Amateur and seventh USGA championship. Pak, a junior at Florida State University, set a program record for single-year scoring average (69.56) as a sophomore and won four of his 11 events, including the 2019 ACC Championship. He became the third Seminole golfer to earned Golfweek and GCAA first-team All-American honors in the same season. Pak advanced to match play in all four U.S. Junior Amateurs he competed in, reaching the semifinals in 2016 and the quarterfinals in 2015.

Matt Parziale, 32, of Brockton, Mass., won the 2017 U.S. Mid-Amateur Championship by defeating Josh Nichols, 8 and 6, at Capital City Club (Crabapple Course), in Atlanta, Ga. Parziale became the first Mid-Amateur champion to earn a full exemption into the following year’s U.S. Open. His margin of victory matched the third-largest in championship history. Parziale, a former firefighter with the Brockton Fire Department, and Luis Gagne were the low amateurs in the 2018 U.S. Open, tying for 48th at Shinnecock Hills Golf Club. In the past year, Parziale left firefighting for the insurance business. He competed in the 2018 Masters and reached the quarterfinals of this year’s Massachusetts Amateur for the second straight year.

Trent Phillips, 19, of Inman, S.C., is a sophomore at the University of Georgia who is competing in his second consecutive U.S. Amateur. In 2018, Phillips reached the Round of 16 in the U.S. Junior Amateur and the Round of 32 in the U.S. Amateur. He was named the SEC Freshman of the Year and earned second team All-American honors during his freshman season. Phillips, who became the first player since 1991 to win consecutive South Carolina Junior Championships, was a three-time Class 4A/5A state high school championship medalist (2014, 2015, 2017) in South Carolina. His brother, Trevor, is a senior at Georgia and has played in two U.S. Amateurs.

Garrett Rank, 31, of Canada, is competing in his eighth U.S. Amateur and 18th USGA championship. In 2016-17, he became a full-time official in the National Hockey League after working for several years in the American Hockey League. Rank won the 117th Western Amateur on Aug. 3, defeating Daniel Wetterich, 3 and 2, in the final. He became the first Canadian to win the championship in 42 years and the first mid-amateur to win the title since 1997. Rank, who overcame a cancer scare at age 23, competed in the 2018 U.S. Open at Shinnecock Hills. Rank was the runner-up in the 2012 U.S. Mid-Amateur and advanced to at least the quarterfinals with partner Patrick Christovich in three consecutive U.S. Amateur Four-Balls (2016-18).

Jovan Rebula, 22, of South Africa, is the nephew of 1994 and 1997 U.S. Open champion Ernie Els. Last year, Rebula defeated Robin Dawson to capture the 123rd Amateur Championship, conducted by The R&A, at Royal Aberdeen Golf Club. He became the first South African to win the Amateur since Bobby Cole in 1966. Rebula, who is a rising senior at Auburn University, was selected as an honorable mention Ping All-American for the second straight season after claiming the 2019 Southeastern Conference Championship individual title. He competed in the 2019 U.S. Open and is playing in his second U.S. Amateur.

Isaiah Salinda, 22, of South San Francisco, Calif., was a semifinalist in last year’s U.S. Amateur at Pebble Beach, losing to Devon Bling, 1 up. Salinda, who graduated from Stanford University this spring, was a large part of Stanford’s national championship season. He won twice, finished sixth overall at the NCAA Championships and went 3-0 in match play to lead the Cardinal to the title, including a 4-and-3 victory over Cole Hammer in the championship match. Salinda was a second-team All-American in 2018-19 and is competing in his second USGA championship. He won the 2018 Pacific Coast Amateur by one stroke over Austin Eckroat.

Luke Schneiderjans, 21, of Alpharetta, Ga., is the third varsity athlete from his family to play sports for Georgia Tech. His older brother Ollie (Georgia Tech, 2015) won the Mark McCormack Medal as the No.1 player in the World Amateur Golf Ranking in 2014 and another brother Ben (Georgia Tech, 2018) was a baseball pitcher who now caddies for Ollie, a PGA Tour pro. Playing for the Yellow Jackets in the 2017 NCAA Stanford Regional, Luke shot 62 with 11 birdies in the second round.

Henry Shimp, 22, of Charlotte, N.C., is playing in his third U.S. Amateur and first since 2016. A rising senior at Stanford University, Shimp was a member of the national championship team this May and secured one of the winning match points in the 3-2 victory over Texas. He won the Carolinas Junior back-to-back years in 2014 and 2015.

Alex Smalley, 22, of Greensboro, N.C., is competing in his fourth consecutive U.S. Amateur. He reached match play in 2017 and was the stroke-play medalist and advanced to the Round of 32 in 2016. Smalley, a 2019 graduate of Duke University, earned Ping All-Region honors for the fourth straight year and graduated as the Blue Devils’ career scoring leader with a 71.32 career average in 49 tournaments. He was named 2019 ACC Scholar-Athlete of the Year, finished tied for 7th in the NCAA Athens Regional and tied for 18th in the ACC Tournament. In 2019, Smalley won the Sunnehanna Amateur by five strokes, becoming the fifth golfer and first since Rickie Fowler (’07 & ’08) to win consecutive titles.

James Song, 18, of Rancho Santa Fe, Calif., advanced to match play for the fourth consecutive year in the U.S. Junior Amateur last month at Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio, after reaching the Round of 16 in 2018. Song fired a 62 at Oak Valley Golf Club in sectional qualifying to compete in the 2016 U.S. Amateur. Song, who was born in Vancouver, British Columbia, is a rising sophomore at the University of California.

Hayden Springer, 22, of Columbine Valley, Colo., shot a 10-under 134 and earned medalist honors at the Columbine Valley qualifier. Springer, a 2019 graduate of Texas Christian University, outdueled 2018 U.S. Amateur champion Viktor Hovland to win the 2019 Big 12 Conference individual title in April. He plans to turn pro later this year. In 2018, the Texan won the Trans-Mississippi title. He also played in the 2017 U.S. Amateur.

Preston Summerhays, 16, of Scottsdale, Ariz., won the 2019 U.S. Junior Amateur at Inverness Club in Toledo, Ohio, defeating Bo Jin in the final match, 2 and 1. One week prior to his U.S. Junior Amateur title, he captured his second consecutive Utah State Amateur, having become the youngest player (age 15) to win the championship in 2018. He broke a record that was shared by Tony Finau and his uncle Daniel. Summerhays is the son of former PGA Tour player Boyd, the nephew of current PGA Tour player Daniel and the great nephew of Bruce, who won three PGA Tour Champions events. Preston, who attends Chaparral High School, shot 65-60 in 2018 U.S. Amateur qualifying, the lowest 36-hole sectional score since 2011. In 2019, he played in the Korn Ferry Tour’s Utah Championship and posted top-10 finishes in the Ping Heather Farr Classic (T-7) and Junior Invitational at Sage Valley (T-10).

Sahith Theegala, 21, of Chino Hills, Calif., is competing in his fourth consecutive U.S. Amateur after reaching the quarterfinals in 2016 and Round of 32 in 2017. Theegala is playing in his ninth USGA championship, including the 2017 U.S. Open at Erin Hills. A redshirt senior at Pepperdine University, he sat out the 2018-2019 with a wrist injury. The prior season, he earned third-team All-America honors and was All-West Region and All-West Coast Conference for the third consecutive year. In his return from injury this summer, Theegala won the Southern California Golf Association Amateur Championship and finished runner-up at the Sahalee Players Championship.

Michael Thorbjornsen, 17, of Wellesley, Mass., won the 2018 U.S. Junior Amateur Championship, defeating Akshay Bhatia, 1 up, in the 36-hole final at Baltusrol Golf Club. As a result of his victory, he received an exemption into the 2019 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach (Calif.) Golf Links, where he was one of four amateurs to make the cut, finishing in 79th place. Thorbjornsen, who also reached match play in the 2018 U.S. Amateur at Pebble Beach, represented the victorious USA Team in the 2018 Junior Ryder Cup last fall in France. He won the 2016 Drive, Chip & Putt National Final (ages 14-15) at Augusta National Golf Club and was the 2012 and 2013 U.S. Kids Golf National Player of the Year.

Karl Vilips, 17, of Australia, is competing in his third U.S. Amateur. Vilips reached the Round of 64 in the 2019 U.S. Junior Amateur after making it to the Round of 32 in 2018. He tied for sixth (best finish by a junior player) in the 2019 Northeast Amateur and matched the course record of 61 in the third round. Vilips has three other top-10 finishes, including second in the AJGA Simplify Boys Championship at Carlton Woods. In 2018, he won the Wyndham Invitational and was the runner-up in the Western Junior. In 2017, he captured the Southern Amateur title and matched Bob Jones (1917) as the youngest champion in tournament history. Vilips, who was born in Indonesia, has used fund-raising activities to travel to tournaments.

Jeff Wilson, 56, of Fairfield, Calif., captured his first USGA championship in the 2018 U.S. Senior Amateur at Oregon’s Eugene Country Club, defeating Sean Knapp, 2 and 1. Wilson is the general sales manager at an automobile dealership. He abandoned a professional golfer’s life, bouncing around mini-tours, for a more stable career path. Wilson, who was reinstated as an amateur in 1997, has had success over the years in USGA championships. He tied for 31st in the 2018 U.S. Senior Open at The Broadmoor and became the second player to earn low amateur in both the U.S. Open and U.S. Senior Open, joining Marvin “Vinny” Giles III. Wilson, who was low amateur in the 2000 U.S. Open at Pebble Beach (Calif.) Golf Links, is competing in his 11th U.S. Amateur and 36th USGA championship.

Brandon Wu, 22, of Scarsdale, N.Y., played in two major championships this year, the U.S. Open and The Open Championship at Royal Portrush. Wu finished tied for 35th in the U.S. Open at Pebble Beach. Wu, a 2019 graduate of Stanford University, was a member of the national championship team in May and delivered one of the winning match points in the final against Texas while going 3-0 in match play during the NCAA Championships. As a senior, Wu earned second team All-American and All-Pac-12 First-Team honors.

Chun An ‘Kevin’ Yu, 21, of Chinese Taipei, was a quarterfinalist in the 2017 U.S. Amateur and reached the Round of 32 last year. He qualified for his second consecutive U.S. Open this summer and finished tied for second in the 2019 Porter Cup. Yu, a senior at Arizona State University, was a GCAA First-Team All-American as a junior after finishing third at the 2019 NCAA Championships and tied for second in the NCAA Stanford Regional. He is playing in his sixth USGA championship.    

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